Tuesday, March 17, 2009

POST 3: LOU: Hippie culture & tattoos








The hippie subculture was originally a youth movement that began in the United States during the early 1960s and spread around the world. The word hippie derives from hipster, and was initially used to describe beatniks who had moved into San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury district. These people inherited the countercultural values of the Beat Generation, created their own communities, listened to psychedelic rock, embraced the sexual revolution, and used hallucinogenic drugs, such as marijuana and LSD, as the key to escaping the ties of society and expanding their individual consciousness.
Hippies were mainly white teenagers and young adults who shared a hatred and distrust towards traditional middle-class values and authority. They rejected political and social orthodoxies but embraced aspects of Eastern religions, particularly Buddhism. The hippies were known as much for their political outspokenness as for their long hair and colorful psychedelic clothing. Their opposition to the Vietnam War became one of the most significant aspects of the growing antiwar movement throughout the latter half of the 1960s.

In the late 1960s, there was a tattoo renaissance thanks to the anti-war, hippie, Civil Rights, gay and feminist movements. These traditionally marginalized groups found tattoo art that represented their individual styles, and overturned the popularity of the traditional masculine tattoo flash art. Even now years on from the initial Hippie Movement, the younger generation still recognize these certain tattoos as that of the Hippie culture. Symbolic of peace, and love, and freedom, Hippie tattoos that are well known include, the yin yang, 'flower power' and bright rainbow designs, doves, the peace sign, and even strips of bright colours and curvy lined design can be symbolic of Hippie culture and their beliefs on life.






3 comments:

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  2. What are these ideas?- love, peace, and freedom. These notions are quite foreign to me, please elaborate Lou. O.O

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